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HTLV-III exposure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Abstract

To the Editor: There have been no confirmed occupation-related cases of AIDS in health care workers in the United States. We have been following two nurses who participated in mouth-to-mouth re­suscitation of a patient with the AIDS-related complex, who was positive for human T-cell lymphotropic virus Type- III/lymphade­nopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), and we here report their seronegativity nine months after exposure.… Read more

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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at children’s hospitals in the United States

Abstract

Although methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as an important pathogen in hospitalized adults in the United States, reports of MRSA in pediatric patients have been infrequent. To determine the frequency at which MRSA is isolated from children, we surveyed the directors of microbiology at all acute care children’s hospitals in the United States, and 57 of 67 (85%) laboratory directors responded to a mailed questionnaire.… Read more

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An historical perspective on controversy surrounding the international code of marketing of breast‑milk substitutes

Jason JM, McGrady GA.

In: Clinical Obstetrics – A Public Health Perspective.  B P Sachs & D Acker (eds).  PSG, Inc. Boston, MA, 1985.

ISBN 0-88416-513-2

An historical perspective on controversy surrounding the international code of marketing of breast‑milk substitutes was last modified: October 20th, 2015 by Jason JM, McGrady GA… Read more
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HTLV I/II and HTLV III seroprevalence in blood product recipients

Abstract

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been strongly implicated as the etiology of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a T-cell type non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with leukemic manifestations in Japan, the Caribbean, and the southeastern United States. The prevalence of serum antibody specific for one core antigen of HTLV-I, p24, has been found to be high in patients with ATL, and higher in relatives of these patients than in general population controls.… Read more

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Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) p24 antibody in New York City blood product recipients

Abstract

Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I)

is known to be associated with certain hematologic malignancies, and a related virus, HTLV-III/LAV, might be the cause of AIDS. Some persons with AIDS have had evidence of HTLV-I infection. Unrelated to these findings, it has been suggested that HTLV-I is transmitted via blood products.… Read more

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HTLV-III/LAV antibody status of spouses and household contacts assisting in home infusion of hemophilia patients

Abstract

Thirty-four adult and pediatric hemophilia A and B patients and 50 nonhemophilic members belonging to 28 families were enrolled in August 1984 in a study of human T cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody status and T cell subpopulation numbers.… Read more

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Pseudomonas cepacia colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis: risk factors and clinical outcome

Abstract

During the period of 1979 to 1983, 38 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) at the CF center of St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Pennsylvania developed respiratory tract colonization with Pseudomonas cepacia. Seventeen (45%) of the patients with colonization died.… Read more

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Lymphadenopathy-associated virus antibodies and T cells in hemophiliacs treated with cryoprecipitate or concentrate

Abstract

Evidence for exposure to lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) was investigated in 48 patients with hemophilia, 15 of whom had been treated exclusively with single-donor cryoprecipitate. The prevalence of antibodies to LAV in all patients was 53% in 1983 and 63% in 1984, while in patients treated only with cryoprecipitate, the prevalence was 31% in 1983 and 40% in 1984.… Read more

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Human T-lymphotropic retrovirus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus antibody. Association with hemophiliacs’ immune status and blood component usage

Abstract

We studied the human T-lymphotropic retrovirus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody status of 234 factor VIII concentrate recipients, 36 factor IX concentrate recipients, 69 long-term recipients of frozen packed red blood cells, and 47 persons not receiving routine transfusion therapy.… Read more

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HTLV-I antibody status in hemophilia patients treated with factor concentrates prepared from U.S. plasma sources and in hemophilia patients with AIDS

Abstract

Serum samples from 85 Austrian hemophilia patients treated with lyophilized factor concentrates prepared from U.S. plasma sources, 24 hemophilia patients from Georgia on a home therapy program with factor concentrates, and 10 U.S. hemophilia patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were analyzed by two different methods for the presence of antibodies to the major internal antigen of human T-cell leukemia virus I (HTLV-I) p24.… Read more

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Immune status of blood product recipients

Abstract

Persons with hemophilia are at risk of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and clinically asymptomatic hemophiliacs have shown a high incidence of AIDS-like immune abnormalities, facts leading to speculation that many hemophiliacs have been exposed to the AIDS agent through their blood products.… Read more

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Klebsiella pneumoniae: selected virulence factors that contribute to pathogenicity

Abstract

Klebsiella pneumoniae infections occur in humans of all ages, however the highest risk groups appear to be infants, the elderly and the immunocompromised. One or more virulence factors may contribute to pathogenicity in humans. In this article we review three factors that may mediate virulence: cell wall receptors, capsular polysaccharide, and endotoxin.… Read more

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The epidemiology of nosocomial infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae

Abstract

Klebsiella pneumoniae causes serious epidemic and endemic nosocomial infections. We conducted a literature review to characterize the epidemiology of epidemic K. pneumoniae outbreaks. Eighty percent of the outbreaks (20/25) involved infections of the bloodstream or urinary tract. Person-to-person spread was the most common mode of transmission, and nearly 50% of the outbreaks occurred in neonatal intensive care units.… Read more