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Nosocomial outbreaks: the Centers for Disease Control’s Hospital Infections Program experience, 1980-1990. Epidemiology Branch, Hospital Infections Program

Abstract

From January 1980 to July 1990, the Hospital Infections Program of the Centers for Disease Control conducted 125 on-site epidemiologic investigations of nosocomial outbreaks. Seventy-seven (62%) were caused by bacterial pathogens, 11 (9%) were caused by fungi, 10 (8%) were caused by viruses, five (4%) were caused by mycobacteria, and 22 (18%) were caused by toxins or other organisms.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System: plans for the 1990s and beyond

Abstract

The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System is an ongoing collaborative surveillance system among the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and United States hospitals to obtain national data on nosocomial infections. This system provides comparative data for hospitals and can be used to identify changes in infection sites, risk factors, and pathogens, and develop efficient surveillance methods.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Surgical wound infection rates by wound class, operative procedure, and patient risk index. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

Abstract

To perform a valid comparison of rates among surgeons, among hospitals, or across time, surgical wound infection (SWI) rates must account for the variation in patients’ underlying severity of illness and other important risk factors. From January 1987 through December 1990, 44 National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System hospitals reported data collected under the detailed option of the surgical patient surveillance component protocol, which includes definitions of eligible patients, operations, and nosocomial infections.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Analysis of risk factors for surgical wound infections following vascular surgery

Abstract

Although surgical wound infections (SWI) following implantation of prosthetic devices can be catastrophic and often require removal of the prosthesis, few studies have identified risk factors for these infections. We conducted a prospective multicenter study to identify risk factors for SWI.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Serratia marcescens surgical wound infection following breast reconstruction

Abstract

Surgical wound infections due to gram-negative bacilli have been rarely reported following breast implant surgery. From April to November 1989, four patients from one plastic surgeon’s practice developed Serratia marcescens surgical wound infection (SWI) following breast reconstruction procedures with implantation of six expandable mammary implants.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Nosocomial infection rates in adult and pediatric intensive care units in the United States. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

Abstract

To determine which intensive care unit (ICU) infection rate may be best for interhospital and intrahospital comparisons and to assess the influence of invasive devices and type of ICU on infection rates, we analyzed data from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Comparison of rates of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units in the United States. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

Abstract

To determine nosocomial infection (NI) rates among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) that are useful for interhospital comparison, we analyzed data reported in 1986-1990 from 35 hospitals that have level III NICUs and used standard National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance protocols and NI site definitions.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Nosocomial infections in elderly patients in the United States, 1986-1990. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

Abstract

We analyzed 101,479 nosocomial infections in 75,398 adult patients (greater than 15 years) that were reported to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system between 1986 and 1990 by 89 hospitals using the NNIS hospital-wide surveillance component. Overall, 54% of the infections occurred in elderly patients (greater than or equal to 65 years).… Read more

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Secular trends in nosocomial primary bloodstream infections in the United States, 1980-1989. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

Abstract

More than 25,000 primary bloodstream infections (BSIs) were identified by 124 National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System hospitals performing hospital-wide surveillance during the 10-year period 1980-1989. These hospitals reported 6,729 hospital-months of data, during which time approximately 9 million patients were discharged.… Read more

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[CDC definitions for nosocomial infections 1988]

Abstract

Garner JS, Jarvis WR, Emori TG, Horan TC, Hughes JM

Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena) 1991 Sep;85(17):818-27

PMID: 1659046

[CDC definitions for nosocomial infections 1988] was last modified: September 10th, 1991 by Garner JS, Jarvis WR, Emori TG, Horan TC, Hughes JM… Read more
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Hepatitis A outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit: risk factors for transmission and evidence of prolonged viral excretion among preterm infants

Abstract

An outbreak of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) provided the opportunity to examine the duration of HAV excretion in infants and the mechanisms by which HAV epidemics are propagated in NICUs. The outbreak affected 13 NICU infants (20%), 22 NICU nurses (24%), 8 other staff caring for NICU infants, and 4 household contacts; 2 seropositive infants (primary cases) received blood transfusions from a donor with HAV infection.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Microbial growth and endotoxin production in the intravenous anesthetic propofol

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we measured microbial growth and endotoxin production in the intravenous anesthetic propofol using 10 different microbial strains; 6 isolated from outbreak cases and 4 from laboratory stock cultures.

DESIGN: In each trial, endotoxin-free glass tubes containing 10 ml propofol were inoculated with 10(0)-10(3) CFU/ml of the test organism and incubated at 30 degrees C for 72 hours.… Read more