Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Risk factors and risk adjustment for surgical site infections in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery patients

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The complexity of congenital cardiac defects and the aggressive medical management required to support patients through their recovery place children at high risk for surgical site infection (SSI).

METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of children undergoing cardiothoracic surgery at a tertiary care referral center between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2001.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Guidelines on blood cultures

Abstract

Just over one-third of sepsis patients have positive blood cultures, mainly due to inadequate sampling volumes (50% of adults have < 1.0 CFU/mL blood) and the prior use of antibiotics. However, 20-30% of sepsis patients are given inappropriate empirical antibiotics. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines recommend paired culture sets to help discriminate between contaminant organisms and true pathogens; four 10-mL bottles (2 sets) should be used for the initial evaluation to detect about 90-95% of bacteremias and six 10-mL bottles (3 sets) should be used to detect about 95-99% of bacteremias. It has also been shown that the positivity rate increased by 15-35% with resin-based media in patients on antibiotics. For diagnosing catheter-related bloodstream infections, differential time-to-positivity is one method recommended to help determine whether the catheter is truly the source of infection. The proper training of personnel with regard to drawing an appropriate blood volume and the importance of clear labeling of culture bottles is also of critical importance. Furthermore, if the contamination rate is relatively high, hiring dedicated staff who are well-trained in order to get a lower blood culture contamination rate may be cost-effective. It is because high false-positive blood culture rates due to contamination are associated with significantly increased hospital and laboratory charges.

Towns ML, Jarvis WR, Hsueh PR

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2010 Aug;43(4):347-9

PMID: 20688297

Guidelines on blood cultures was last modified: August 1st, 2010 by Towns ML, Jarvis WR, Hsueh PR… Read more
Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Prevention of surgical-site infections

Abstract

Farr BM, Jarvis WR

N. Engl. J. Med. 2010 Apr;362(16):1541; author reply 1542-4

PMID: 20414961

Prevention of surgical-site infections was last modified: April 22nd, 2010 by Farr BM, Jarvis WR… Read more
Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: dealing with reality, resistance, and resistance to reality

Abstract

Jarvis WR

Clin. Infect. Dis. 2010 Jan;50(2):218-20

PMID: 20001538

Prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: dealing with reality, resistance, and resistance to reality was last modified: January 15th, 2010 by Jarvis WR… Read more