Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

The Roles of Epidemiologists, Laboratorians, and Public Health Agencies in Preventing Invasive Cronobacter Infection

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cronobacter can cause severe, invasive infection in very young infants. These bacteria can also colonize or cause insignificant infections in immunocompromised, elderly, and/or hospitalized adults.

METHODS: This editorial review highlights key points addressed in the Frontiers Research Topic on Cronobacter, discusses the clinical presentation and epidemiology of Cronobacter infections, and examines the responses of public health agencies to this problem.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Meta-analysis on central line-associated bloodstream infections associated with a needleless intravenous connector with a new engineering design

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intravenous needleless connectors (NCs) with a desired patient safety design may facilitate effective intravenous line care and reduce the risk for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI). We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the risk for CLA-BSI associated with the use of a new NC with an improved engineering design.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Multicenter cohort study to assess the impact of a silver-alloy and hydrogel-coated urinary catheter on symptomatic catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a silver-alloy hydrogel catheter on symptomatic catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs).

DESIGN: Multicenter before-after non-randomized cohort study.

SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Seven acute care hospitals ranging in size from 124 to 607 beds participated in this study.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Comparison of central line-associated bloodstream infection rates when changing to a zero fluid displacement intravenous needleless connector in acute care settings

Abstract

This was a multicenter, quasiexperimental, 140-month, acute care study comparing central line-associated bloodstream infection rates associated with positive or negative intravenous connectors to a zero fluid displacement connector. A decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections was found after changing from either negative or positive intravenous connectors to the zero fluid displacement connector (P = .004) with total cost savings of over $3 million.… Read more