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Addressing the public’s concerns about human immunodeficiency virus transmission in health-care settings

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The 1990 report of a cluster of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with a Florida dentist with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome attracted considerable media coverage and legislative attention. A number of polls found that the public favored mandatory HIV-antibody testing of health-care workers.… Read more

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Absence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected hemophilic men

Abstract

Concern for transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) infection to recipients of infected cellular blood products has prompted development of tests to eliminate blood units with HTLV-I antibodies. Most hemophilic men from the United States became infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) before HIV donor screening and before blood products were processed to inactivate the virus.… Read more

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Geographic variability of hemophilia-associated AIDS in the United States: effect of population characteristics. Hemophilia-Associated AIDS Study Group

Abstract

National AIDS surveillance suggests that approximately 3.5% of all hemophilic patients in the United States have developed AIDS as of February 1988; however, the cumulative incidence of AIDS among seropositive patients at individual hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs) has been reported to be as high as 12%.… Read more

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Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA in hemophilic men and their sex partners. Hemophilia-AIDS Collaborative Study Group

Abstract

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to assess in hemophilic men whether any were HIV-seropositive but uninfected or seronegative but infected and in seronegative sex partners of seropositive hemophilic men whether any were infected.… Read more

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Duration of human immunodeficiency virus infection before detection of antibody

Abstract

To estimate the duration and frequency of the period of HIV infection without detectable antibody, modelling techniques were applied to results of detection of HIV DNA by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to data from cases in published reports.  … Read more

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Risk of developing AIDS in HIV-infected cohorts of hemophilic and homosexual men

Abstract

The latency period and/or incidence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) may differ in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus by different routes or having different “cofactors.” We compared 79 hemophilic men in Pennsylvania and 117 homosexual and bisexual men in California, all having known dates of infection and long postinfection observation periods, to examine these hypotheses.… Read more

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Sex practice correlates of human immunodeficiency virus transmission and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome incidence in heterosexual partners and offspring of U.S. hemophilic men

Abstract

We assessed the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from heterosexual seropositive hemophilic men to their female sex partners through an HIV serosurvey and questionnaire study conducted during 1984-1987. Five percent of 21 female partners of asymptomatic men and 11% of 35 partners of HIV-symptomatic (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS], AIDS-related complex [ARC], peripheral generalized lymphadenopathy [PGL]) hemophilic men had been infected when first tested.… Read more

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HIV and hemophilic children’s growth

Abstract

The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) often has profound effects on growth; however, the effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on asymptomatic children’s growth are unknown. Before heat inactivation/HIV donor screening of factor concentrates, many hemophilic children became infected with HIV.… Read more

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Human immunodeficiency virus infection in hemophilic children

Abstract

The following groups were compared: (1) children less than 18 years old who have hemophilia-associated acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with other children with AIDS and with adults who have hemophilia-associated AIDS and (2) asymptomatic HIV-infected hemophilic children with asymptomatic HIV-infected hemophilic adults.… Read more

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Racial differences in care of patients with hemophilia

Abstract

Hemophilia treatment centers were first established in the mid­-1970s to provide optimal and coordinated medical care to patients with the disorder. Our study suggests that blacks with hemophilia may be receiving less coordinated care and less appropriate blood­ product therapy than whites with hemophilia.… Read more

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Hemophilia-associated AIDS in the United States, 1981 to September 1987

Abstract

Between January 1, 1981 and September 4, 1987, 407 cases of hemophilia-associated acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had been reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The number of cases diagnosed each year nearly doubled, except in 1986, when cases increased only 50 per cent.… Read more

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Potential effect of revising the CDC surveillance case definition for AIDS

Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) revised the surveillance case definition for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in August, 1987. To determine the impact of this revision, information was extracted from the medical charts of the 630 patients receiving comprehensive medical care as of 1980 at 6 haemophilia treatment centres, and who were therefore likely to have been infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).… Read more

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The Epidemiology of AIDS

Abstract

Cases of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were first reported in June and July of 1981, as clusters of Kaposi’s sarcoma and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among homosexual men. Since then, epidemiologic surveillance has been used by investigators and public health professionals to identify that an outbreak existed, to characterize the outbreak, and to determine and predict its extent and course.… Read more

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Hemophiliac patient’s knowledge and educational needs concerning acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

Abstract

The Patient Knowledge Assessment Study (PKAS) was conducted among 107 male hemophilic patients, aged 15 to 67 years, at 19 hemophilia treatment centers (HTC). Participants were given a 30-item questionnaire concerning the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the groups at risk, and modes of transmission.… Read more

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The course of the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States hemophilia population

Abstract

The time course of the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as it has occurred in the US hemophilia population is examined using surveillance data collected by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). These data indicate that the epidemic course in hemophiliacs is distinguishable from that in the homosexual/bisexual and intravenous drug-using populations in at least one respect–the epidemic in the hemophilia population is characterized by a lack of consistent increase in the number of new AIDS cases in successive time intervals.… Read more

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Effects of exposure to factor concentrates containing donations from identified AIDS patients. A matched cohort study

Abstract

We compared recipients of eight lots of factors VIII and IX voluntarily withdrawn from distribution because one donor was known to have subsequently developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with a nonexposed cohort matched by age, sex, and factor use. The factor VIII recipient cohorts did not differ in prevalence of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (exposed, 75%; nonexposed, 86%), T-cell subset numbers (median: exposed, 619 T-helper cells per cubic millimeter; nonexposed, 659 T-helper cells per cubic millimeter), T-helper to T-suppressor ratios, or immunoglobulin levels.… Read more

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HTLV-III/LAV-seronegative, virus-negative sexual partners and household contacts of hemophiliacs

Abstract

Public concern about the transmissibility of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III/ lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) has been heightened by several reports suggesting the existence of an antibody-negative, virus-positive state in some asymptomatic sex partners of persons who are antibody-positive.  We recently evaluated 88 household members and/or sex partners of persons with hemophilia and found that only two nonhemophiliacs were HTLV-III/LAV antibody-positive.  … Read more

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Conjugal transmission of HTLV-III and lymphadenopathy in Christmas disease

Abstract

The risk of conjugal transmission of the HTLV-III/LAV virus associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in patients with hemophilia is unknown.  To date, only a few   instances of proven exposure to HTLV-III have been reported among sexual or family contacts of   patients with hemophilia.  … Read more

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HTLV-III/LAV antibody and immune status of household contacts and sexual partners of persons with hemophilia

Abstract

We evaluated the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody and immune status of 88 persons living with and/or sexual partners of 43 hemophiliacs, 12 of whom had AIDS, five of whom had AIDS-related complex (ARC), 17 of whom were clinically well but HTLV-III/LAV antibody positive, and nine of whom were well and HTLV-III/LAV antibody negative.… Read more

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HTLV-III exposure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Abstract

To the Editor: There have been no confirmed occupation-related cases of AIDS in health care workers in the United States. We have been following two nurses who participated in mouth-to-mouth re­suscitation of a patient with the AIDS-related complex, who was positive for human T-cell lymphotropic virus Type- III/lymphade­nopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), and we here report their seronegativity nine months after exposure.… Read more

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HTLV I/II and HTLV III seroprevalence in blood product recipients

Abstract

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been strongly implicated as the etiology of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a T-cell type non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with leukemic manifestations in Japan, the Caribbean, and the southeastern United States. The prevalence of serum antibody specific for one core antigen of HTLV-I, p24, has been found to be high in patients with ATL, and higher in relatives of these patients than in general population controls.… Read more

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Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) p24 antibody in New York City blood product recipients

Abstract

Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I)

is known to be associated with certain hematologic malignancies, and a related virus, HTLV-III/LAV, might be the cause of AIDS. Some persons with AIDS have had evidence of HTLV-I infection. Unrelated to these findings, it has been suggested that HTLV-I is transmitted via blood products.… Read more

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HTLV-III/LAV antibody status of spouses and household contacts assisting in home infusion of hemophilia patients

Abstract

Thirty-four adult and pediatric hemophilia A and B patients and 50 nonhemophilic members belonging to 28 families were enrolled in August 1984 in a study of human T cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody status and T cell subpopulation numbers.… Read more

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Lymphadenopathy-associated virus antibodies and T cells in hemophiliacs treated with cryoprecipitate or concentrate

Abstract

Evidence for exposure to lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) was investigated in 48 patients with hemophilia, 15 of whom had been treated exclusively with single-donor cryoprecipitate. The prevalence of antibodies to LAV in all patients was 53% in 1983 and 63% in 1984, while in patients treated only with cryoprecipitate, the prevalence was 31% in 1983 and 40% in 1984.… Read more

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Human T-lymphotropic retrovirus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus antibody. Association with hemophiliacs’ immune status and blood component usage

Abstract

We studied the human T-lymphotropic retrovirus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody status of 234 factor VIII concentrate recipients, 36 factor IX concentrate recipients, 69 long-term recipients of frozen packed red blood cells, and 47 persons not receiving routine transfusion therapy.… Read more

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HTLV-I antibody status in hemophilia patients treated with factor concentrates prepared from U.S. plasma sources and in hemophilia patients with AIDS

Abstract

Serum samples from 85 Austrian hemophilia patients treated with lyophilized factor concentrates prepared from U.S. plasma sources, 24 hemophilia patients from Georgia on a home therapy program with factor concentrates, and 10 U.S. hemophilia patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were analyzed by two different methods for the presence of antibodies to the major internal antigen of human T-cell leukemia virus I (HTLV-I) p24.… Read more

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Immune status of blood product recipients

Abstract

Persons with hemophilia are at risk of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and clinically asymptomatic hemophiliacs have shown a high incidence of AIDS-like immune abnormalities, facts leading to speculation that many hemophiliacs have been exposed to the AIDS agent through their blood products.… Read more

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Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in hemophiliacs

Abstract

From mid-1977 to mid-1983 the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has received reports of more than 2,100 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These cases had either biopsy-confirmed Kaposi’s sarcoma or a biopsy or culture confirmed life-threatening opportunistic infection, without an identifiable cause of immunosuppression.… Read more

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Perspective comprehension of AIDS

Evatt BL, Jason J

Proc 4th Int Symp HT 1984; p 97‑102.

Perspective comprehension of AIDS was last modified: October 17th, 2015 by Evatt BL, Jason J… Read more
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AIDS in hemophilia

Evatt BL, Chorba T, McGrady G, Jason JM.

 

Proc 4th International Symp on Hemophilia Treatment, Tokyo, Japan, 1984; p 1‑14.

AIDS in hemophilia was last modified: October 17th, 2015 by Evatt BL, Chorba T, McGrady G, Jason JM… Read more
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Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated with transfusions

Abstract

Of 2157 patients with the acquired immunode­ficiency syndrome (AIDS) whose cases were reported to the Centers for Disease Control by August 22, 1983, 64 (3 per cent) with AIDS and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had no recognized risk factors for AIDS.… Read more

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Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in hemophiliacs

Abstract

From mid-1977 to mid-1983 the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has received reports of more than 2,100 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These cases had either biopsy confirmed Kaposi’s sarcoma

or a biopsy or culture confirmed life-threatening opportunistic infection, without an identifiable cause of immunosuppression.… Read more