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Automated Evaluation of AIDS Messages with High‐Risk, Low‐Literacy Audiences

Abstract

A series of televised public service announcements (PSAs) about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was evaluated with 100 black participants attending a Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinic in Atlanta, Georgia. Since the literacy level of the participants was suspected to be low, questions were administered orally and an electronic data collection technique was used which permitted the participants to push buttons, as opposed to speaking or writing responses.… Read more

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Addressing the public’s concerns about human immunodeficiency virus transmission in health-care settings

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The 1990 report of a cluster of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with a Florida dentist with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome attracted considerable media coverage and legislative attention. A number of polls found that the public favored mandatory HIV-antibody testing of health-care workers.… Read more

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Educating Young Adults About HIV and AIDS: the Impact of Direct Response Television Public Service Advertising

ABSTRACT Limited resources combined with a desire to reach as many people as possible often make direct response public service announcements an important tool in educational campaigns. To understand the impact of direct-response TV PSAs, and find ways to increase their effectiveness, this study examined 1) the effects of a highly targeted HIV prevention message on young adults’ knowledge, perceptions, and intentions; and 2) whether altering two PSA elements, the telephone number used and the length of time it was displayed, would affect viewers’ recall and intention responses.  … Read more

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Potential use of mass media to reach urban intravenous drug users with AIDS prevention messages

Abstract

To access the potential of using the mass media to reach urban intravenous drug users (IVDUs) with AIDS prevention messages,

we: 1) questioned 353 participants in a Baltimore IVDU cohort study on their media use and sources of AIDS information, 2) analyzed data on Baltimore AIDS public service announcement (PSA) airings during a 3-month period, and 3) discussed with media executives their willingness to air a variety of potential AIDS messages.… Read more

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Hemophilia growth and development study. Design, methods, and entry data

Abstract

PURPOSE: The study design, research questions, and baseline data are presented from a multicenter longitudinal epidemiologic investigation of the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on three areas of functioning in children and adolescents with hemophilia: physical growth and sexual maturation, immune function, and neurological and neuropsychological functioning.… Read more

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Using indices to differentiate dimensions of knowledge regarding modes of HIV transmission in the U.S. population, 1987-1989

Abstract

The number of HIV-infected individuals is increasing, making it important for the public to understand not only how HIV is transmitted but also the lack of transmission risk associated with casual contact. Using CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics National Health Interview Survey, we divided modes of transmission items into two areas of knowledge: “True Transmission” and “False Transmission.” Items were recoded with scores from 3 for the most correct response to 0 for the most incorrect response for each of three items related to true and each of eight items related to false transmission.… Read more

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Recall of AIDS public service announcements and their impact on the ranking of AIDS as a national problem

Abstract

The efficacy of two public service announcements from Phase V of the “America Responds to AIDS” (ARTA) campaign was assessed at two sites. Participants were randomly assigned to view a local news program, one with an ARTA public service announcement appearing six times and the other with no AIDS public service announcements.… Read more

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A system for evaluating the use of media in CDC’s National AIDS Information and Education Program

Abstract

The National AIDS Information and Education Program (NAIEP) commissioned the National Academy of Sciences to design a prototypical system of research for use in the evaluation of the agency’s media campaign. It consists of four types of evaluation: formative, efficacy, process, and outcome.… Read more

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Paid advertising for AIDS prevention–would the ends justify the means?

Abstract

An examination by the Centers for Disease Control and the Research Triangle Institute concluded that “hard-to-reach” populations could be reached with AIDS prevention messages through the broadcast and print media and that a study should be undertaken to assess whether paid placement of these messages could have an effect on HIV-related behaviors.… Read more

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Evaluating the “America Responds to AIDS” Campaign

Abstract

Social marketing is “the design, implementation, and control of programs seeking to increase the acceptability of a social idea or practice in a target group.” It has existed in the United States for over a century and at various times has focused on such health-related behaviors as tobacco use, alcohol and drug use, control of hypertension, cancer screening, seat belt use, and-recently-behaviors placing a person at risk for HIV infection or a sexually transmitted disease.… Read more

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HIV and hemophilic children’s growth

Abstract

The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) often has profound effects on growth; however, the effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on asymptomatic children’s growth are unknown. Before heat inactivation/HIV donor screening of factor concentrates, many hemophilic children became infected with HIV.… Read more

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Human immunodeficiency virus infection in hemophilic children

Abstract

The following groups were compared: (1) children less than 18 years old who have hemophilia-associated acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with other children with AIDS and with adults who have hemophilia-associated AIDS and (2) asymptomatic HIV-infected hemophilic children with asymptomatic HIV-infected hemophilic adults.… Read more

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Hemophiliac patient’s knowledge and educational needs concerning acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

Abstract

The Patient Knowledge Assessment Study (PKAS) was conducted among 107 male hemophilic patients, aged 15 to 67 years, at 19 hemophilia treatment centers (HTC). Participants were given a 30-item questionnaire concerning the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the groups at risk, and modes of transmission.… Read more

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Epidemiologic analysis of a cluster of homicides of children in Atlanta

Abstract

Between July 1, 1979, and March 15, 1981, there were 22 unsolved homicides and two unsolved disappearances of Atlanta children. Using epidemiologic methods, we attempted to identify factors that had put children at an increased risk of homicide. That all victims in this cluster were black, killed away from home, and that asphyxiation was overrepresented suggests that the cluster was discrete.… Read more

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Centers for Disease Control and the epidemiology of violence

Abstract

Violence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The Center for Health Promotion and Education, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has begun to apply epidemiologic techniques to study the problems of child abuse, child homicide, homicide, and suicide.… Read more

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Homicide as a cause of pediatric mortality in the United States

Abstract

Homicide is a major cause of pediatric mortality. National law enforcement data were analyzed to characterize and differentiate neonaticide, infanticide, filicide, and overall child homicide. Results include the following: Neonaticides often involved parents or unidentified perpetrators and occurred proportionately more in rural areas than did other types of child homicide.… Read more

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Child homicide spectrum

Abstract

Violence toward children is an acknowledged pediatric problem, but physicians may not be aware that it is a leading cause of pediatric mortality. Therefore, I used homicide data for persons younger than 18 years of age to characterize child homicide.… Read more

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Epidemiologic characteristics of primary homicides in the United States

Abstract

Homicide is one of the five leading causes of death for all persons 1-44 years of age. Over half of the homicides occurring in 1979 did not involve the perpetration of another crime. The authors have defined these as primary homicides and suggest that these deaths require the formulation of public health and social services prevention strategies.… Read more

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A comparison of primary and secondary homicides in the United States

Abstract

In 1979, over 20,000 people in the United States were victims of homicide, but public health agencies have not yet defined their role in its prevention. Role definition might begin with differentiating various forms of homicide, so the authors used data on all homicides reported by law enforcement agencies for 1976-1979 to determine whether homicides that did not occur during the perpetration of another crime (primary homicides) differ from those that occurred during the perpetration of another crime (secondary homicides).… Read more

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Underrecording of infant homicide in the United States

Abstract

Homicide rates for infants dropped suddenly between 1967 and 1969. The abrupt nature of this decline suggested the change was artifactual. Investigation suggests that two classification revisions instituted at this time were causes of this decline: changes in related codes set forth in the Eighth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases, Adapted, and revision of the standard certificate of death in 1968.… Read more

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Fatal child abuse in Georgia: the epidemiology of severe physical child abuse

Abstract

Decisions about the occurrence of child abuse are increasingly difficult to make because concepts of what qualifies as reportable child abuse may be broadening.

We examined this question by comparing 51 fatal child abuse cases occurring in Georgia between July 1975 and December 1979 to non-fatal cases and to the Georgia population.… Read more

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Child abuse in Georgia: a method to evaluate risk factors and reporting bias

Abstract

From July 1975 through December 1979, the Georgia Department of Protective Services Central Registry recorded population-based data on confirmed, non-confirmable, and ruled-out child abuse reports. We propose that reporting biases are reflected in the differential characteristics of confirmed and ruled-out reports of child abuse.… Read more

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Sexually Abused Children and Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Abstract

Sexual  abuse  of  children  is  a  complex  problem that has had, until recently, received only limited recognition and discussion in the pediatric literature. The reasons for this are twofold. First, the magnitude of the problem is unrecognized. Sexual child abuse is grossly underreported, with a true incidence perhaps 10-fold higher than the reported incidence.… Read more

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Epidemiologic differences between sexual and physical child abuse

Abstract

Sexual and physical child abuse are assumed to differ; however, these differences have not been well characterized epidemiologically. Furthermore, despite assumed differences, these types of abuse are often analyzed as one entity. This can have significant effects on assessment of risk and recommendations for intervention.… Read more

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Objective birth data and the prediction of child abuse

Abstract

Data from the USA suggest that many cases of abuse are not reported to child abuse agencies.  It is highly likely that the population characteristics associated with risk of abuse may actually represent risk of abuse coming to the attention of the authorities.… Read more