Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Pregnancies in human immunodeficiency virus-infected sex partners of hemophilic men. The Hemophilia-AIDS Collaborative Study Group

Abstract

We investigated 24 completed pregnancies of 20 healthy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive sex partners of 20 seropositive hemophilic men. One woman had recurrent herpes simplex type 2 infection; no woman was known to use illicit drugs or to have other purported cofactors for vertical HIV transmission.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Parenting Your Premature Baby

Jason J, van der Meer A. Holt Publishing Company, NY, NY, 1989.

Above book was published in paperback by Dell Publishing Company, New York, NY in June, 1990. German publication rights for above book given in 1991.

Parenting Your Premature Baby was cited in the Library Journal as one of the best lay medical books for public libraries (1988-89).… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Infectious disease-related deaths of low birth weight infants, United States, 1968 to 1982

Abstract

Infant mortality rates in the United States are higher than in any other developed country. Low birth weight (LBW) is the primary determinant of infant mortality.

 

Despite city, state, and federal programs to prevent LBW, decreases in infant mortality in the 1980s appear to be largely secondary to improved survival of LBW infants rather than to a decline in the rate of LBW births.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

An outbreak of necrotizing enterocolitis. Association with transfusions of packed red blood cells

Abstract

Of 187 newborns admitted to a 33-bed, level III neonatal intensive care unit between January 1, 1985 and June 23, 1985, 33 developed necrotizing enterocolitis during their hospital stay. Twenty of the 33 newborns (61%) had onset of symptoms between April 1 and June 23, suggesting clustering during this period.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Infectious diseases: preventable causes of infant mortality

Abstract

After almost a century of improvement, the rate of decrease in US infant mortality rates began to level off during the period of 1982 to 1984. Rates actually increased in some states. Because much of the decline in infant mortality in this century can be attributed to advances in infectious disease treatment and prevention programs, we evaluated the current impact of infectious diseases on infant mortality.… Read more

Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

An historical perspective on controversy surrounding the international code of marketing of breast‑milk substitutes

Jason JM, McGrady GA.

In: Clinical Obstetrics – A Public Health Perspective.  B P Sachs & D Acker (eds).  PSG, Inc. Boston, MA, 1985.

ISBN 0-88416-513-2

An historical perspective on controversy surrounding the international code of marketing of breast‑milk substitutes was last modified: October 20th, 2015 by Jason JM, McGrady GA… Read more
Illustration(s) pertain to the topic addressed in this publication, not the specific research or data presented in the publication

Mortality and infectious disease associated with infant-feeding practices in developing countries

Abstract

This review examines the available studies bear­ing on the relation between infant-feeding mode and infectious illness in the populations of less­ developed countries.  In this review we will address the following key questions: (1) whether the method of infant feeding (breast v other) is associated with differences in rates of mortality, both overall and infectious, and in rates of infectious morbidity in less-developed countries; (2) whether differences exist between breast-feeding and other feeding methods in terms of infection rates for specific pathogens; and (3) whether the evidence is strong enough to suggest that any association is a causal one, ie, that the effect noted is actually caused by breast-feeding rather than other factors associated with rates of illness.  … Read more