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Risk of developing AIDS in HIV-infected cohorts of hemophilic and homosexual men

Abstract

The latency period and/or incidence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) may differ in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus by different routes or having different “cofactors.” We compared 79 hemophilic men in Pennsylvania and 117 homosexual and bisexual men in California, all having known dates of infection and long postinfection observation periods, to examine these hypotheses.… Read more

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The Epidemiology of AIDS

Abstract

Cases of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were first reported in June and July of 1981, as clusters of Kaposi’s sarcoma and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among homosexual men. Since then, epidemiologic surveillance has been used by investigators and public health professionals to identify that an outbreak existed, to characterize the outbreak, and to determine and predict its extent and course.… Read more

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The course of the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States hemophilia population

Abstract

The time course of the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as it has occurred in the US hemophilia population is examined using surveillance data collected by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). These data indicate that the epidemic course in hemophiliacs is distinguishable from that in the homosexual/bisexual and intravenous drug-using populations in at least one respect–the epidemic in the hemophilia population is characterized by a lack of consistent increase in the number of new AIDS cases in successive time intervals.… Read more

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HTLV I/II and HTLV III seroprevalence in blood product recipients

Abstract

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been strongly implicated as the etiology of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a T-cell type non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with leukemic manifestations in Japan, the Caribbean, and the southeastern United States. The prevalence of serum antibody specific for one core antigen of HTLV-I, p24, has been found to be high in patients with ATL, and higher in relatives of these patients than in general population controls.… Read more

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Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) p24 antibody in New York City blood product recipients

Abstract

Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I)

is known to be associated with certain hematologic malignancies, and a related virus, HTLV-III/LAV, might be the cause of AIDS. Some persons with AIDS have had evidence of HTLV-I infection. Unrelated to these findings, it has been suggested that HTLV-I is transmitted via blood products.… Read more

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HTLV-III/LAV antibody status of spouses and household contacts assisting in home infusion of hemophilia patients

Abstract

Thirty-four adult and pediatric hemophilia A and B patients and 50 nonhemophilic members belonging to 28 families were enrolled in August 1984 in a study of human T cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody status and T cell subpopulation numbers.… Read more

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Lymphadenopathy-associated virus antibodies and T cells in hemophiliacs treated with cryoprecipitate or concentrate

Abstract

Evidence for exposure to lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) was investigated in 48 patients with hemophilia, 15 of whom had been treated exclusively with single-donor cryoprecipitate. The prevalence of antibodies to LAV in all patients was 53% in 1983 and 63% in 1984, while in patients treated only with cryoprecipitate, the prevalence was 31% in 1983 and 40% in 1984.… Read more

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Human T-lymphotropic retrovirus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus antibody. Association with hemophiliacs’ immune status and blood component usage

Abstract

We studied the human T-lymphotropic retrovirus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) antibody status of 234 factor VIII concentrate recipients, 36 factor IX concentrate recipients, 69 long-term recipients of frozen packed red blood cells, and 47 persons not receiving routine transfusion therapy.… Read more

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HTLV-I antibody status in hemophilia patients treated with factor concentrates prepared from U.S. plasma sources and in hemophilia patients with AIDS

Abstract

Serum samples from 85 Austrian hemophilia patients treated with lyophilized factor concentrates prepared from U.S. plasma sources, 24 hemophilia patients from Georgia on a home therapy program with factor concentrates, and 10 U.S. hemophilia patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were analyzed by two different methods for the presence of antibodies to the major internal antigen of human T-cell leukemia virus I (HTLV-I) p24.… Read more

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Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated with transfusions

Abstract

Of 2157 patients with the acquired immunode­ficiency syndrome (AIDS) whose cases were reported to the Centers for Disease Control by August 22, 1983, 64 (3 per cent) with AIDS and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had no recognized risk factors for AIDS.… Read more